Intravitreal injections

Sometimes medications need to be injected into your eye to treat specific diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, branch retinal vein occlusion, central retinal vein occlusion or diabetic retinopathy. This is known as an intravitreal (into the eye) injection. This does not hurt, because numbing eye drops are given first. The best medication for your eye depends on the disease process. Intravitreal medications include:

Anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (anti-VEGF):

  • Ranibizumab (Lucentis®)
  • Aflibercept (Eylea®)
  • Bevacizumab (Avastin)

Steroids:

  • Triamcinolone acetonide (Triesence®)
  • Dexamethasone (Ozurdex®)

The injection will be performed in the clinic room under sterile conditions. Afterwards you can perform normal daily activities and do not usually require eye drops or an eye patch. If you have concerns such as severe pain or worsening of vision, please contact the clinic or Associate Professor Fung immediately. Often injections need to be repeated after 1-2 months. This will depend on your eye condition and Associate Professor Fung will discuss this with you further.

Laser surgery

Laser surgery can be performed for several eye conditions, including retinal tears, branch retinal vein occlusion, central retinal vein occlusion, diabetic retinopathy and central serous chorioretinopathy. It can usually be performed in the clinic. The laser is applied either at a slit lamp with a special contact lens or through a headlamp (indirect ophthalmoscope). Afterwards you can perform normal daily activities and do not usually require eye drops or an eye patch.

Vitrectomy surgery

Vitrectomy surgery in a hospital is performed for many common surgical retinal diseases, including macular holes, epiretinal membranes, vitreomacular traction, retinal detachment and vitreous haemorrhage. This key-hole surgery is performed through the white part of the eye (sclera), usually under local anaesthesia. During the surgery you will be able to hear your operative team but you won’t see anything or feel any pain. If you do have any discomfort or concerns, please notify the team. Otherwise, please lie as still as possible and relax. Most vitrectomy operations will take between 30minutes and 2 hours, depending on the complexity.

What to do after your surgery

After the surgery you will have a patch placed on your eye – leave this on until the next morning. Depending on the surgery, you may be asked to position your head (“posture”) in a certain way. If this is for long periods of time you may wish to hire a posture pillow such as summit support. You will be given eye drops to use for a month- the order of the drops is not important, however, you should wait a few minutes between instilling each drop.

Avoid excessive exertion, swimming, getting your eye wet, rubbing your eye or driving until instructed by Associate Professor Fung. If a gas bubble is placed into your eye at the time of surgery will not be allowed to fly on an aeroplane or go to high altitudes until this has dissolved.

You will be able to perform most normal daily activities. Although your vision may initially be blurred in the operated eye, it is safe to read and watch television. If you have concerns such as severe pain or worsening of vision, please contact the clinic or Associate Professor Fung immediately.

Latest equipment

Associate Professor Fung has access to all the latest diagnostic and management equipment for your eye, including:

  • Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT)
  • Fundus autofluorescence
  • Fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA)
  • Indocyanine green angiography (ICG)
  • Optical coherence tomography-angiography (OCT-A)
  • Wide-field imaging
  • B-scan ultrasonography
  • Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM)
  • Anterior segment OCT
  • Biometry
  • Argon laser
  • YAG laser
  • Photodynamic therapy
  • Intravitreal injections
  • Modern vitrectomy surgery